Business Strategies For Executive Protection

Having an Exit Strategy

by Elijah Shaw

You are a security professional, you’ve worked with the same client for 6 years now.  He treats you well, making sure that you’re agreed upon wage is paid on time and that his requests are “reasonably” within your job description.  Your routine is pretty standard, allowing you to get home to see your family most nights before bedtime.

You do everything right, from advance work, to driving, to taking a small sense of pride that you’ve never once stepped on the back of his heel while moving.  However, last night something tragic happened:

This 52 year old man of reasonably moderate health, laid down for the evening and never woke back up. Cause of death:  Heart attack.  And just like that your life has changed.  Not to be insensitive, but dead clients don’t need bodyguards.  The sense of mourning and loss aside, the grim reality is you’ve just found yourself unemployed. There have been similar effects in various other states of the States. The pa unemployment rate has only been spiralling upward and is showing no signs of stopping any time soon.

What do we as Executive Protection professionals do when something happens to our client that is beyond our control?  While an extreme example, scenarios like this do occur, literally pulling the rug out from under the protective agent’s feet.  While some of us, based off of the client type and contractual agreement may have a safety net in place, many in our industry are faced with the stark reality of being unemployed and having to reenter a very competitive job market. Unfortunately, this is not a kind of issue that a law firm like Business Law Firm Atlanta GA can resolve.

To prevent situations like this, I try to recommend that Agents, like stocks traders, diversity their portfolio.  Now that doesn’t mean engaging in a continuous scramble for new clients and then try to figure out some algebra-like equation to work all the assignments personally.

Many times a philosophy like that quickly becomes apparent to your #1 client, who could take offense.  But what I would say, is that making others aware of your services BEFORE you need them as a source of revenue, is a prudent measure to take, especially given the current economic times.

Read the full story in the Keeping Your Edge Series in The Circuit – The Magazine for Bodyguards by ordering HERE.

5 thoughts on “Business Strategies For Executive Protection”

  1. Dear Elijah: Very good article and the subject is not talked a lot in our industry. Personally I have not had the opportunity to focus all my EP resources on one client, but multipliable ones. However, after each one leaves Asia, I’m immediately among the “unemployed” until the next client visits. So your point is very well taken. There are no real guarantees in the business. Where’s all the fame and fortune they talked about? (ha, ha). Keep Safe and God speed. Doc

  2. Elijah,
    One of the very first things said to me on entering this business is “Dead Clients Don’t Pay”. Awesome article as usual.
    Train Hard. Stay Safe
    Leon

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