Tag Archives: FAA Security

Celebrity Private Plane Crashes

Jenni Rivera, the U.S.-born Mexican-American singer and her entourage were killed in a plane crash. A U.S. aviation investigation board confirmed that Ms. Rivera died in a Learjet 25 crash, which disintegrated on impact Sunday in rugged territory in Nuevo Leon state in northern Mexico.

Additionally, there have been several high-profile crashes involving Learjets, passenger aircraft popular with corporate executives, entertainers and government officials.

A Learjet carrying pro-golfer Payne Stewart and five others crashed in northeastern South Dakota in 1999. Investigators said the plane lost cabin pressure and all on board died after losing consciousness for lack of oxygen. The aircraft flew for several hours on autopilot before running out of fuel and crashing in a corn field.

Former Blink 182 drummer Travis Barker was severely injured in a 2008 Learjet crash in South Carolina that killed four people.

Additional details HERE.

While in the past several years, private aircraft use is certainly down in the world of Celebrities and High Net Worth Individuals, it still is the preferred method of choice.  As with every other method of travel in which an outside service provider must be brought in,  screening, consideration and due diligence must be made, and that means knowing the right questions to ask or having the right people on your team to ask them.

 

 

FAA Loses 100,000 Planes???

The Federal Aviation Administration is missing key information on who owns one-third of the 357,000 private and commercial aircraft in the U.S. — a gap the agency fears could be exploited by terrorists and drug traffickers.

The records are in such disarray that the FAA says it is worried that criminals could buy planes without the government’s knowledge, or use the registration numbers of other aircraft to evade new computer systems designed to track suspicious flights. It has ordered all aircraft owners to re-register their planes in an effort to clean up its files.

About 119,000 of the aircraft on the U.S. registry have “questionable registration” because of missing forms, invalid addresses, unreported sales or other paperwork problems, according to the FAA. In many cases, the FAA cannot say who owns a plane or even whether it is still flying or has been junked.

Full stop.  I think this one is worth repeating:  “the FAA says it is worried that criminals could buy planes without the government’s knowledge, or use the registration numbers of other aircraft to evade new computer systems designed to track suspicious flights”… This of course is just my opinion, but I think the emphasis should be less on if I have a soda in my bag going thru the airport scanner and more about the exact location and ownership of OVER ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND PLANES!?!


For the full amazing story click HERE.